Bunch onions have entered the stadium!

One of the first things we planted in April after the Westeros Winter of 2014 were bunch onions bulbs, bought at the greenhouse. They’ve become dependable friends — pretty much giving us green onions whenever we need them.

Each bulb produces approx 4-6 onions that you can harvest individually. Simply #gardengenius.

Plus, they’re ready so early you can plant more or flip the row by early Summer if you’re zealous at Spring planting.

Bunch onions have entered the stadium!

One of the first things we planted in April after the Westeros Winter of 2014 were bunch onions bulbs, bought at the greenhouse. They’ve become dependable friends — pretty much giving us green onions whenever we need them.

Each bulb produces approx 4-6 onions that you can harvest individually. Simply #gardengenius.

Plus, they’re ready so early you can plant more or flip the row by early Summer if you’re zealous at Spring planting.

"So, you found a patch of morels in your backyard…"

Life is looking up. The Habs are moving onto the Eastern final, it’s 24 hrs until the great Canadian long weekend, affectionately known as Two-Four, begins — and then your husband finds what chefs and foodies, and market-bound forest forgers salivate over in Spring. Morel mushrooms.

Non-believers (ie. skeptical friends and family on Facebook) fear you’ll surely die a Joffrey-style death, clawing at your own throat, if you eat but one bite.

But we know better, and are going to allow some to spore in the hopes of a recurring crop — and others to be eaten with those ramps (wild leeks) we harvested in Haliburton (see prev post).

Now we just need to find some fiddleheads at the farm this weekend, and Carey Price to win his second huge tournament of 2014. No big deal.

"So, you found a patch of morels in your backyard…"

Life is looking up. The Habs are moving onto the Eastern final, it’s 24 hrs until the great Canadian long weekend, affectionately known as Two-Four, begins — and then your husband finds what chefs and foodies, and market-bound forest forgers salivate over in Spring. Morel mushrooms.

Non-believers (ie. skeptical friends and family on Facebook) fear you’ll surely die a Joffrey-style death, clawing at your own throat, if you eat but one bite.

But we know better, and are going to allow some to spore in the hopes of a recurring crop — and others to be eaten with those ramps (wild leeks) we harvested in Haliburton (see prev post).

Now we just need to find some fiddleheads at the farm this weekend, and Carey Price to win his second huge tournament of 2014. No big deal.

These might one day have been radishes. But gardeners understand necessary evil.

I am a radish murderess for the benefit of a healthier and more abundant crop — and just recently dealt with the guilt of robbing seedlings of a full life in a very #GardenGenius way.

When thinning early veggies, like radishes, keep a pail of cold water handy to soak the sacrificial sprouts in. They’ll wash up easily and retain their crunchy crispness if served within 24hrs. Add them to salads, sandwiches or on the side of fish /seafood, chicken or veg meals. I put mine on a bbq’ed hamburger.

These might one day have been radishes. But gardeners understand necessary evil.

I am a radish murderess for the benefit of a healthier and more abundant crop — and just recently dealt with the guilt of robbing seedlings of a full life in a very #GardenGenius way.

When thinning early veggies, like radishes, keep a pail of cold water handy to soak the sacrificial sprouts in. They’ll wash up easily and retain their crunchy crispness if served within 24hrs. Add them to salads, sandwiches or on the side of fish /seafood, chicken or veg meals. I put mine on a bbq’ed hamburger.

May 5, 2014 - This marks my first year as a vegetable garden owner. Now, my husband is half Dutch and my parents are hardy and resilient farmers from Bruce County, so this isn’t a ‘newbie’ situation in the sense that I’m going to do something wack. Nor does it suggest that I’m about to follow the moon cycles for planting and break the bank with organic seeds and free-range manure from flamingos…
This is a nature/nurture situation. Matt and I combine his tulip-loving green-thumb heritage and my pioneer-like parents’ vast resume of experimentation with our mutual Canadian stubbornness and intensity for producing something from the land after a dastardly Winter.
An example of such stubbornness is in our excitement at seeing tomato plants looking prime and on sale at the greenhouse this past weekend. Now it’s *way* too chilly for these girls outside just yet,…but because we’re out of control, random, and do know better - we bought them, anyway.
If you, too, get carried away at the greenhouse or even have one “day beer” too many before finding yourself at the local nursery (via public transit, of course) - try to smarten/sober up by the time you get home.
Instead of sticking the plants into chilly soil or leaving them swaddled in the tiny plastic cell packs or cups from which they came (where their roots are “bound”, aka in a straight jacket) —  *buy a few mediums sized pots for them to strengthen up in for a few weeks before planting when the weather and soil warms. This is a #GardenGenius move! 
*(or better yet borrow or use recycle ones from a prev year). 
Up your game further by filling those next level pots with soil from your own garden where the tomato plants will be moving in to get a sense of how they grow in that soil and also to preps them for their upcoming move.
The photo shows our three gals (Early Girl, Heirloom, and Champion) are no doubt happier paying the same rent for their short-term townhouse until they can upgrade to the full Estate in a few more weeks.
Awesome Ontario Food Quote of the Day:
"Yat,o,regh,shas,ta." (Wayandott, or Huron) - "I am hungry" (English)

May 5, 2014 - This marks my first year as a vegetable garden owner. Now, my husband is half Dutch and my parents are hardy and resilient farmers from Bruce County, so this isn’t a ‘newbie’ situation in the sense that I’m going to do something wack. Nor does it suggest that I’m about to follow the moon cycles for planting and break the bank with organic seeds and free-range manure from flamingos…

This is a nature/nurture situation. Matt and I combine his tulip-loving green-thumb heritage and my pioneer-like parents’ vast resume of experimentation with our mutual Canadian stubbornness and intensity for producing something from the land after a dastardly Winter.

An example of such stubbornness is in our excitement at seeing tomato plants looking prime and on sale at the greenhouse this past weekend. Now it’s *way* too chilly for these girls outside just yet,…but because we’re out of control, random, and do know better - we bought them, anyway.

If you, too, get carried away at the greenhouse or even have one “day beer” too many before finding yourself at the local nursery (via public transit, of course) - try to smarten/sober up by the time you get home.

Instead of sticking the plants into chilly soil or leaving them swaddled in the tiny plastic cell packs or cups from which they came (where their roots are “bound”, aka in a straight jacket) —  *buy a few mediums sized pots for them to strengthen up in for a few weeks before planting when the weather and soil warms. This is a #GardenGenius move! 

*(or better yet borrow or use recycle ones from a prev year). 

Up your game further by filling those next level pots with soil from your own garden where the tomato plants will be moving in to get a sense of how they grow in that soil and also to preps them for their upcoming move.

The photo shows our three gals (Early Girl, Heirloom, and Champion) are no doubt happier paying the same rent for their short-term townhouse until they can upgrade to the full Estate in a few more weeks.

Awesome Ontario Food Quote of the Day:

"Yat,o,regh,shas,ta." (Wayandott, or Huron) - "I am hungry" (English)